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winnieandben

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Re: If you do, or were to, shoe again...
« Reply #15 on: February 11, 2010, 09:23:43 PM »
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  • I wanted to keep Jinx barefoot but was having problems with her front feet wearing down too quiclkly and getting footy (possible mild LGL) but even after changing her diet to suit etc she still would have needed boots.  Only problem was I couldnt get boots to fit her and not rub!
    Ended up getting her shod in front and she has never looked back.  Just standard shoes but her feet have really improved in shape and she is comfortable on all surfaces.

    I am hoping to not need to shoe on the backs as well if possible as so far they are fine barefoot, but will do if she needs it.

    Offline cirocco

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    Re: If you do, or were to, shoe again...
    « Reply #16 on: March 20, 2010, 10:27:25 PM »
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  • Its got to be the right thing for the horse. Its got nothing to do with what people think you should do.

    Ive had barefoot and shod horses for the past 25 years.

    You do what you have to do for your horse, go with your gut instincts.

    I would just say that plastic shoes only seem to work if the horse is stabled. They do not stay on when the horse is out especially when its out on anything but perfect ground, ie no bog, no mud.
    They are expensive, dont last, are useless if your doing any sort of regular road work.

    If I was returning to shoes it would be normal metal ones.



    Offline Peaches

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    Re: If you do, or were to, shoe again...
    « Reply #17 on: March 20, 2010, 10:38:40 PM »
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  • Its got to be the right thing for the horse. Its got nothing to do with what people think you should do.

    Ive had barefoot and shod horses for the past 25 years.

    You do what you have to do for your horse, go with your gut instincts.

    I would just say that plastic shoes only seem to work if the horse is stabled. They do not stay on when the horse is out especially when its out on anything but perfect ground, ie no bog, no mud.
    They are expensive, dont last, are useless if your doing any sort of regular road work.

    If I was returning to shoes it would be normal metal ones.




    Well....I beg to differ so far *touch wood*  ;) Thanks for bumping this cirocco :)

    I went with the plastics in the end, on a temporary trial: there's nothing stopping us switching to steels anytime we choose. Admittedly he is stabled over night at the moment but gets lots of outdoor time, not just an hour or 2...

    I admit I had one moment of *eek what am I doing* when the first nail was hammered in  :-\ However the first hack out I had the afternoon he was shod infront totally dismissed that feeling, and I felt I had done right for us, as I had totally forgotten what he felt like out and about with comfy feet - he was, and still is flying, and so much more comfortable  :db:

    So far I've not had any problems with them: we have the occasional minor slide on tarmac if he jumps into trot a little too quick, but no more than steels - normal nails, no tungsten tips in. I am happier knowing there is a little bit of slip anyway, as I have heard some plastics hold the tarmac *too* much and cause excessive strain on the joints doing so but thats def not the case with these, they seem to have a nice balance. They are wearing pretty well so far but I am only on my first set, and he's holding them fine, no looseness yet. It was always going to be a trial with him as the farrier is trialling these shoes at the moment (hence why they are normal cost and not expensive), and L is the horse in the most amount of work of the horses he has tried them on so we weren't sure how they would hold up, especially as we can do a reasonable amount on tarmac. I don't want to speak too soon as it is still early days but there looks to be plenty wear on them yet. I am still not convinced by the shape of them re bar'ness, but that is something that only time will tell. As far as shape for the foot goes, we are actually really lucky as the size for his foot is just about perfect on shape too, which obviously means the stickibility is bound to be better.

    So far so good anyway....watch this space I guess. I am not regretting front shoes though, and if the plastics don't work I am convinced enough to go back to the steels I think  :nod:

    Offline shoveltrash

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    Re: If you do, or were to, shoe again...
    « Reply #18 on: March 20, 2010, 11:22:00 PM »
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  • what brand of plastic shoes are they?
    sounds good so far :db:

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    Its got to be the right thing for the horse. Its got nothing to do with what people think you should do.
    :nod:
    Trish - Boca Raton, Florida, USA

    "If we are conscientious, beautiful roses can grow from the manure of our recognized and corrected mistakes."
    Erik Herbermann


    Offline Peaches

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    Re: If you do, or were to, shoe again...
    « Reply #19 on: March 20, 2010, 11:27:26 PM »
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  • what brand of plastic shoes are they?
    sounds good so far :db:
    :nod:

    Erm  :-[ Equi ease I think? or something like that...eaze with a z maybe...? I forget..

    They are made not far from me actually I think - they haven't hit the open farriery market yet though I don't think  :)

    Offline Peaches

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    Re: If you do, or were to, shoe again...
    « Reply #20 on: March 20, 2010, 11:29:34 PM »
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  • I just wanted to come back to your post cirocco, as I realise I may have sounded dismissive, sorry I didn't mean it that way at all, it makes perfect sense.

    This inparticular:
    You do what you have to do for your horse, go with your gut instincts.

    :db:

    Offline Cloud_cirrus

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    Re: If you do, or were to, shoe again...
    « Reply #21 on: March 21, 2010, 09:43:23 AM »
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  • I think one of the good things about having been down the barefoot route is that you develop a better eye for hoof balance and become a more enlightened and questioning owner.  Therefore, when you go back to shoes you can spot things you are not happy with and have a more informed discussion with your farrier.  I am not anti shoes, I'm anti bad hoof care whether it is shod or barefoot, I think there are some really great shod hooves out there and there are lots of reasons why barefoot doesn't work for people.

    Sounds like things are going really well  :db:

    Offline ChrissieW

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    Re: If you do, or were to, shoe again...
    « Reply #22 on: March 21, 2010, 10:38:34 AM »
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    I think one of the good things about having been down the barefoot route is that you develop a better eye for hoof balance and become a more enlightened and questioning owner.  Therefore, when you go back to shoes you can spot things you are not happy with and have a more informed discussion with your farrier.  I am not anti shoes, I'm anti bad hoof care whether it is shod or barefoot, I think there are some really great shod hooves out there and there are lots of reasons why barefoot doesn't work for people.


    Well said  :nod:

     :db: :db: Glad that things are going well Peaches  :db:
    Chrissie - West Sussex, UK

    Offline Wendy

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    Re: If you do, or were to, shoe again...
    « Reply #23 on: March 23, 2010, 04:32:48 PM »
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    Therefore, when you go back to shoes you can spot things you are not happy with and have a more informed discussion with your farrier.

    Great theory, the trouble is, farriers tend not to have a clue about all the stuff you learn from the barefoot people - and they actually have opposing views on many things so I tend to keep my discussions on that sort of thing to a minimum now.

    When I first moved back to shoes I had been in the habit of discussing things like WLD at length with my barefoot trimmer - so when he took the shoes off it just came out 'what does his white line disease look like?'  Surprised slightly indignant look from farrier. Answer 'OK explain to me what wld is.' (trying to catch me out). So I get all flustered and mutter something about fungus and black stuff. Quite honestly, I don't think he actually knew the answer. Needless to say, I'm not using him any more.  :laugh:

    But you certainly do have a huge advantage in knowledge over people who have not done the barefoot thing.   :nod:
    "A straight horse isn't a horse without bending, but a horse that uses his four legs to step forward in the direction of movement.''
    Gustav Steinbrecht (18081885)

    Offline loosefur

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    Re: If you do, or were to, shoe again...
    « Reply #24 on: March 24, 2010, 07:42:30 PM »
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  • Interesting thread.

    I went barefoot with my lot in summer last year and at the time I was convinced if it interfered at all with my riding (I compete endurance) I would stick the shoes back on. But having seen how beautiful my horses' feet soon became and how much sounder, happier, better moving and agile they all were I would never even contemplate shoes again. So convinced was I that I went over to the States last year and trained to trim with Jaime Jackson. Whilst over there we looked at so many horses feet, some live and some cadavar - some barefoot, some shod. Without fail all the shod hooves were in awful condition. Even the ones that looked fine on the surface - what I'd always have said was a healthy shod hoof - were pretty dreadful when we dissected them (only the cadavar hooves of course!)... thin hoof walls, thin soles, poorly developed digital cushion etc. By dissecting shod hooves we also saw where the nails really go when they're driven into the feet and again even on well shod hooves just how close the nails come to sensitive tissue. The time I spent in the States made me swear I would never allow a nail to be driven into any hoof of any horse I own ever again.

    Incidentally before I plunged into barefoot I did try plastic shoes but they didn't even last one 50k ride before they fell off. But I can do any length of ride I want in hoof boots without a problem, plus at the end of the ride I can take them off and turn my horse out without worrying if the plastic shoes will still be there in the morning  :db:

    I know barefoot can be a struggle for those horses that are sugar sensitive and if you're on a livery yard it can be hard to control diet enough for those unlucky few that really need to be removed from grass altogether. But just by putting shoes back on doesn't take away the horse's sugar sensitivity - it's still there, rumbling on in the background, progressively weakening the feet, and causing who knows what other health problems in the horse. There simply hasn't been enough research in the area to know what long term damage is done to metabolically challanged and IR horses if the issues aren't addressed. Putting shoes back on masks the problem but doesn't cure it. My argument is always at least barefoot you know straightaway if there is a problem. If the horse is shod it can take weeks or months or years before you get issues and by that point it might be too late to do anything about it. Having lost a horse to navicular a few years ago I just wish I knew then what I knew now and maybe Henry would still be with us.

    But I would never condem anyone who shod their  horses - I'd think they were crazy  :hug: but we've all got to do what we think best.

    MagsnDan

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    Re: If you do, or were to, shoe again...
    « Reply #25 on: April 05, 2010, 08:30:26 PM »
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  • Iv recently put shoes on Jack. Gutted is an understatement but I dont regret it for a second.

    I had thought id never have to shoe jack, feet as tough as nails. Even when i let his feet get abit long while giving him a break from ppl. I never had a problem. But over the winter with the fields so wet he got foot sore to the point he would be on 3 legs refusing to move( first time it was OMG he has trod on a nail... jack bit of a sensitive drama queen :doh:)

     Needless to say it would have been cruel not to have put them on, in hindsight my only regret is that I didnt do it sooner for Jacks sake.

     Not looked into the plastic shoes though but you have just prompted me to have a look :)

    Offline Belbe

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    Re: If you do, or were to, shoe again...
    « Reply #26 on: June 08, 2010, 06:29:49 PM »
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  • Have u tried the easyboot gloves with powerstraps? real snug fit? (measure by the smallest measurement as they give a lot)
    if not, can't u use glue-ons for the summer? if properly stuck, they can stay for over a month. (Pete Ramey teaches some kickass tricks for this) (use filling material or adapted pads if u choose this cos otherwise u get peripheral loading like a shoe)

    I never advise shoes cos the only horses I know that have feet as good as barefoot using shoes around here would be very hard to mimic. Basically, the owner shoes them himself importing his own soft iron and having his own shoes made. He reshoes and trims every 3 weeks and has the horses working hard all day on every footing. The shoes come off as soon as working season finishes and the soft iron does let the hoof expand as it grows. Now where in the hell can you find shoeing service like this? I'd say better stick with glue-ons.


    I dunno, I have all the horses I ride barefoot and they where swiming in mud all winter long. They all got soft frogs and I was pushed to keep them desinfected all the time so thrush wouldn't eat them away. The sole and walls themselves dealt fine, though wearing down loads more than usual but still the one that only eats hay had the toughest hooves of them all. I use front boots on every hack, the Boas and the Gloves never fall off. The Calevo boots rub like hell! scrached those off the list! Never tried any others. Thing is, all those horses live and work on rocky terrain so that might be why they never get too bad. I any case, I'd always preffer casting or glueing boots to nailing shoes. Just be sure whoever does it is really experienced! otherwise they'll fall off in a second!
    « Last Edit: June 08, 2010, 06:38:11 PM by Belbe »
    "... you leave it to horse people to put tradition ahead of science." _Pete Ramey

    Offline Peaches

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    Re: If you do, or were to, shoe again...
    « Reply #27 on: June 08, 2010, 07:04:36 PM »
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  • Belbe, was the reply to me? (I only ask as the thread has bounced about about now, and I can't remember offhand how the last discussions went, and haven't re read  :-[)

    If so....Yep I tried the gloves with powerstraps - I had them for fronts and backs and whilst for his backs they've been fabulous, they never ever were any good for his fronts - they'd twist even just walking on hard ground. The backs have never shifted for any work on any terrain - even when they were initially on the big side (even with powerstraps) they were great - now they still are, but i took the power straps off cos they were tight (not that I ever need to use them now really as his hinds seem to be like rock at the mo :D) They were just wrong shape for his front feet coming straight out of shoes.

    I have him shod infront now, and tbh for the next few months I feel he's best staying that way - come mid september, the shoes will already come off then as I'm away from home so no need for shoes if not doing much work, and he'll stay that way till summer probably - then we'll reassess as to front shoes or no front shoes :/ ((And just for the record - my farrier is a big advocate of time out of shoes every year, and actually was the one to encourage to try 'barefoot' in the first place  ;)))