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Author Topic: For horses that suffer with mud fever .... Could it be Alfalfa?  (Read 9473 times)

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Offline samboc77

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just an update.

Beach has had NO mud fever at all this year and neither has Mr Jones who was previously on alfalfa. Both have faired really well in the horrible mud and I have had a ppretty easy year as far as mud fever is concerned! :yahoo:

Other horses in the area suffered badly so I think I may have found his trigger. It will be interesting to see what this year brings ;)

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Offline luckyrider

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Re: For horses that suffer with mud fever .... Could it be Alfalfa?
« Reply #16 on: December 05, 2008, 04:39:00 PM »
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  • Samboc, how are the steeds doing?  I ask because I have held off giving Alfalfa because of your thread, and we got mud fever anyway -- for the first time ever.  It is down to the terrible weather here.  I don't think anyone is getting nice weather right now though.

    Have yours succumbed or are they still MF-free?
    Shaking the tree in leafy Maisons-Laffitte

    Offline samboc77

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    Re: For horses that suffer with mud fever .... Could it be Alfalfa?
    « Reply #17 on: December 05, 2008, 05:00:31 PM »
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  • Nope mine are totally Mud fever free  :santa_cool: and slopping around in mud  :santa_undecided:

    I know that Beach is allergic to Alfalfa as we went to course where Beach was given a breakfast with Aflalfa in it. When I arrived later that morning I took one look at him and it was visible to see that the white fur was on his face it has swollen up slightly. It was the same on his legs.  :santa_angry:

    When I went in to the stable and saw the bucket he had left most of the Alfalfa but I figured the swelling was just from what he had taken in whilst trying to eat the other bits that where in there.... thankfully he is not a great fan of alfalfa anyway! He was so grumpy that day as well, all figetty and just not him.

    I then was really worried he would end up with a major mud fever as his skin was so sore. I called the vet and we put him on bute for a couple of days and his skin settled down and thankfully this one incident didn't trigger a bad skin episode. Though he does have really bad scuffy skin at the moment so I am watching him like a hawk but by now he would normally have it. I have upped his Linseed to help the skin which is making a difference thankfully. I think ensuring they have nice oily skin helps keep the bactria at bay.

    Sorry that your neds now have mud fever for the first time  :santa_embarrassed: What have you put them on instead of Alfalfa?

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    Offline shoveltrash

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    Re: For horses that suffer with mud fever .... Could it be Alfalfa?
    « Reply #18 on: December 05, 2008, 09:34:44 PM »
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  • my boy is on a completely alfalfa-free diet, yet is suffering horribly from mud fever, and has been for months now.  the only thing that has improved his is scrubbing with chlorhexidene after removing the scabs.
    :sad:

    happy to hear that your two are mud fever free! :)
    Trish - Boca Raton, Florida, USA

    "If we are conscientious, beautiful roses can grow from the manure of our recognized and corrected mistakes."
    Erik Herbermann


    Offline luckyrider

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    Re: For horses that suffer with mud fever .... Could it be Alfalfa?
    « Reply #19 on: December 06, 2008, 02:16:44 PM »
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  • Samboc, he is on some bog-standard bucket feed of pellets and flakes along with four handfuls of fibergy, TopSpec Comprehensive supplement, magox and a very generous slug of soya oil.  Not really sure why I chose soya oil... higher in protein I thought?  But maybe I can find Linseed oil, is it linseed oil you are talking about?

    He gets a quite miserly hay ration morning and evening, too.
    Shaking the tree in leafy Maisons-Laffitte

    Offline Jolene

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    Re: For horses that suffer with mud fever .... Could it be Alfalfa?
    « Reply #20 on: December 19, 2008, 03:27:49 PM »
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  • Some horses are allergic to soy and will present with skin issues, I remember PintoPiaffe's stud would have scratches/mud fever and they never went away fully until she took him off of a supplement that included soy, so might want to give that a go too?
    Jolene & Handsome
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    Offline Flyingfox

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    Re: For horses that suffer with mud fever .... Could it be Alfalfa?
    « Reply #21 on: December 06, 2010, 09:49:41 PM »
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  • Horses with skin lesions like mud fever or facial acne and photosensitisation are often allergic to the endophyte infested rye grasses found globally. They make the grasses perform better for cows, but many horses ( and cows) are allergic to these myco toxins and they are causing liver damage, which is manifesting as skin lesions. It can be assisted by using mycosorb and ideally removing the horse from the endophyte ridden pasture.

    Alfalfa is more of a problem with sugar intolerant horses and insulin resistance/laminitis as it is high in fructans.

    Garlic is a product to also avoid feeding horses as this can cause pernicious anaemia in horses, sometimes even with low doses added to feed, but is variable between individuals. The claims of garlic causing blood purification or assisting with breathing issues are unproven with horses.
    Its not what you do, but the way that you do it.

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